Dr Dyah Pitaloka



Senior Lecturer in Communications and Media Studies
School of Arts and Social Sciences

Dyah.Pitaloka@monash.edu
+603 5514 6000
Room 2-6-37
Orcid ID : 0000-0002-5603-1290

Dyah Pitaloka is Senior Lecturer in Communications and Media Studies at Monash University Malaysia. She was a Fulbright scholar and received her PhD from the University of Oklahoma and has held academic positions at the National University of Singapore and the University of Sydney, Australia.

Dyah’s research explores issues related to marginalisation in contemporary healthcare, narrative in digital health, development & global health policy, and ICT for social change. They are looking at how cultural meanings are negotiated and co-constructed by community members in their interactions with various social, structural, educational, economic, religious, and policy contexts that surround their lives. She has worked on these topics in relation to Indonesia, Singapore, Vietnam and Australia. Dyah won two research grants from the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) and is currently working on two research projects: 1) the COVID-19 policy and Indonesian domestic migrant workers health; and 2) the disconnection, digital resilience, and differently abled communities during the Covid-19 Pandemic Indonesia and Vietnam. In addition, she is also working on hate speech in relation to COVID-19. Her works have been widely published in The Communication Review, Social Movement Studies, Information, Communication & Society, Health Communication, Qualitative Health Research, and Frontiers Communication.

Dyah is also interested in exploring the use of arts-based methods for health and social justice and has been working closely with a group of women survivors’ choir on the use of songs and choral performance in trauma healing. She has published commentaries in The Jakarta Post (Dialita Choir, A Celebration of Hope, 18 December 2017); (From Victims to Survivors: The Healing Journey of the Dialita Choir, 27 September 2016), and book chapters which will be out in 2021.

Dyah is a traditional Balinese dancer and has been dancing since she was 5 years old. She uses dance to introduce issues related to gender, cross-gender performer, power and identity – another topic of research that she is also interested in.

Qualifications

PhD (Communication), University of Oklahoma

MA (Strategic Communication & Advertising), University of Leeds, United Kingdom

Bachelor of Law/SH (Law), Diponegoro University, Semarang, Indonesia

Professional Affiliations

International Communication Association (ICA)

Asian Studies Association of Australia (ASAA)

Research Interests

Dyah’s research focuses on issues related to marginalisation in contemporary healthcare, narrative in digital health, development & global health policy, and ICT for social change. They are looking at how cultural meanings are negotiated and co-constructed by community members in their interactions with various social, structural, educational, economic, religious, and policy contexts that surround their lives. She has worked on these topics in relation to Indonesia, Singapore, Vietnam and Australia.

Research Projects 

Dyah received two research grants from the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) and is currently working on two projects. The first project titled, ‘Well-being in a Time of Social Distancing: Indonesian Domestic Workers in Singapore and Hong Kong’ investigates the effects that reproduced because of the several policies that being put into place to deal with the virus, such as social distancing, quarantine, and lockdown. Most importantly, this study attempts to understand how Indonesian female domestic workers living in Singapore and Hong Kong find their ways of coping and maintaining their well-being – including the use of technology and social media in maintaining relationships with others during the lockdown. The second project, ‘The (dis)connecting effects of digital platforms and the digital resilience of differently able communities during the Covid-19 pandemic in Indonesia and Vietnam’ combines critical disability studies with body of knowledge in Information Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D) and Asian studies. The main focus is to explore the usefulness of technologies for the different able to seek, use, and share information during a global scale of pandemic like Covid-19 in Southeast Asia.

Education

Before starting work at Monash, Dyah was lecturer at the Department of Indonesian Studies at the University of Sydney, where she coordinated and taught courses focusing on the social, cultural, historical, and political aspects of Indonesia. She received ‘Teaching Commendation’ for coordinating and teaching Social Activism in Southeast Asia and Dealing with Indonesia’s Diversity. Prior to Sydney, She was a postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Communication and New Media, National University of Singapore (NUS) and taught undergraduate level units Cultural Industries, and Seminar on Communication for Social Change.

Dyah has supervised honours and master theses on topics such as health, culture and society; intercultural communication; communication and social change; and broader topics in the area of strategic communications.

At Monash, Dyah teaches AMG5400 Global Digital Media: Issues in International and Transnational Communication, and AMU2450 Contemporary Media Theory.

Journal articles

Rohman, A., & Pitaloka, D. (2020). A blast from the past: Memories, social media, and peace movement. The Communication Review. DOI: 10.1080/10714421.2020.1829304.

Rohman, A., & Pitaloka, D. (2020). What leads a movement to disband? Frictions within the Kopi Badati movement, Ambon, Indonesia, Social Movement Studies. DOI: 10.1080/14742837.2020.1805308.

Dutta M, Pandi AR, Zapata D, Mahtani R, Falnikar A, Tan N, Thaker J, Pitaloka D, Dutta U, Luk P and Sun K. (2019). Critical Health Communication Method as Embodied Practice of Resistance: Culturally Centering Structural Transformation Through Struggle for Voice. Front. Commun. 4:67. DOI: 10.3389/fcomm.2019.00067

Rohman, A., Pang, N., & Pitaloka, D. (2018). The episodes of a Facebook group for information sharing in the Ambon 2011 conflict prevention movement, Indonesia. Information, Communication Society, DOI: 10.1080/1369118X.2018.1521456

Pitaloka, D., & Hsieh, E. (2015). Health as submission and social responsibilities: Embodied experiences of Javanese women with type II diabetes. Qualitative Health Research, 25(8), 1155-1165. DOI: 10.1177/1049732315577607. [5-year IF (2016): 2.036].

Book chapters

Pitaloka, D. (2018). The Use of Mobile Phones in Rural Javanese Villages: Knowledge Production and Information Exchange Among Poor Women with Diabetes. In Emma Baulch, Jerry Watkins and Amina Tariq (Eds.), mHealth Innovation in Asia: Grassroots Challenges and Practical Interventions, (pp. 49-68). Dordrecht: Springer.

Pitaloka, D., & Dutta, M. (2018). Embodied memories and spaces of healing: Culturally-centering voices of the survivors of 1965 Indonesian mass killings. In Mohan Jyotti Dutta & Dazzelyn Baltazar Zapata (Eds.), Communicating for Social Change: Meaning, Power, and Resistance. Singapore: Palgrave Macmillan

Dutta, M., Pitaloka, D., Zapata, D. (2018). Negotiating transgender sex work, health and healing in Singapore: A culture-centered approach. In Jolanta Drzewiecka (Eds.), Global Dialectics in Intercultural Communication: Case Studies. New York: Peter Lang.

Forthcoming 2021

Pitaloka, D., & Dutta, M J. Singing the hope: Turning unspoken trauma into song. In Mark Micale & Hans Pols (Eds.), Trauma in History: Asian Perspective, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Pitaloka, D., & Pols, H. Performing songs and staging theatre performances: Working through the trauma of the 1965 Indonesian mass killings. In Peter Leese, Julia B. Köhne, & Jason Crouthamel (Eds.), Languages & Trauma, Toronto: University of Toronto Press

Pitaloka, D., & Martin, N. We don’t want to cause public panic: Pandemic Communication of Indonesian Government in Responding to COVID-19. In Douglas A. Vakoch (Ed.), Coronavirus in International Media.

Research Grants 

Pitaloka, D., Nababan, F., 2020-2021: Well-being in a Time of Social Distancing: Indonesian Domestic Workers in Singapore and Hong Kong, Rapid-Response Grants on COVID-19, Social Science Research Council and The Wenner-Gren Foundation, US$5,000.

Rohman, A., Pitaloka, D., 2021: The (dis)connecting effects of digital platforms and the digital resilience of differently able communities during the Covid-19 pandemic in Indonesia and Vietnam, Just Tech COVID-19 Rapid-Response Grants, Social Science Research Council and The Ford Foundation, US$6,000.

Djenar, N., Lewis, V., Rubino, A., Basheer, N., Alhadesh, A., Wang, W., Shidong An, I., Abied, R., Pitaloka, D., 2018-2019: Socially Embedded Diabetes Management among CALD Groups in Western Sydney, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Compact Funding, The University of Sydney, AU$75,000.

Suter, R., Penaloza, F., Sorbera, L., Moores, S., Pitaloka, D., 2017: Enhancing cultural competence and cross-cultural interdisciplinary effectiveness (Open Learning Environment – Undergraduate, DVC Education/Small Educational Innovation Grant, School of Languages and Cultures, The University of Sydney.

Areas of Research & Supervision

Dr Dyah Pitaloka welcomes enquiries on PhD supervision on broad research areas such as (1) health activism and community action; (2) narrative in digital health; (3) ICT for social change; (4) global health, communication and development; and (5) everyday interactions in Southeast Asia.

Awards

  • Top Three Finalists, 2015 Joint ICA/NCA Health Communication Dissertation Award
  • Ragan-Kramer-Wieder Qualitative Dissertation Award, The University of Oklahoma, 2014
  • Ted Beaird Graduate Student Award, The University of Oklahoma, 2013
  • Ralph Cooley Graduate Student Award, The University of Oklahoma, 2012
  • Research Fellow Award, Center for Social Justice, University of Oklahoma, 2012-2013